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How to thin Ranch dressing?

I found a recipe online for Ranch dressing that uses mayonnaise, sour cream, and buttermilk. The ratio of these ingredients are to my like (tastes good enough). However, I’d like the dressing to be a bit thinner (more liquidy). How would I go about achieving this? Add milk, cream, water, or something else? …read more

How to store chicken breasts for cooking

I’ve been getting into preparing chicken sandwiches for lunch for my family. I’ve tried poaching them first then grilling the following day, only to find that the flavor has escaped and chicken dried out.

A cool, supple chicken breast is really the best way to have a flavorful chicken sandwich, since it would cook in its juices and thus keep moist.

Since a lot of burger joints serve chicken sandwiches, I was wondering if anyone knew how they kept their chicken breasts ready to cook day after day. However I would presume that they slice and prep the breasts in advance (maybe the night prior). …read more

How to keep biryani hot and moist for a long time

I am looking forward to opening a biryani stall in my area, but my supplier of prepared biryani is far away. What method can I adopt to keep biryani rice fluffy, moist and hot for longer period of time? I want to keep it hot in a prepared condition for eight hours. …read more

How to keep biryani hot and humid for a long time

I am looking forward to opening a biryani stall in my area, but my supplier of prepared biryani is far away. What method can I adopt to keep biryani rice fluffy, moist and hot for longer period of time? I want to keep it hot in a prepared condition for eight hours. …read more

Turning Harissa into Hot Sauce

I have some Harissa at home but I will probably never use it up as I do not cook meals that are that hot too often. As I think that it’s hotness tastes a bit like the hotness of Hot Sauce (as known in the US) I would like to know if and how it’s possible to turn Harissa paste into something that resembles Hot Sauce. (Since Hot Sauce can be added to any meal individually after cooking easily it’s much more likely that I will be able to use up some Hot Sauce than the Harissa.) …read more

Composition/safety of cherry pits

I’d like to prepare cherry preserves (/marmalade), but I’d like to save on the time it takes to remove the pits. I’m considering cooking them whole, with gentle mashing, then removing the pits once at the end.

The only problem is the analogy with apple seeds. Apple seeds contain a small amount of arsenic that makes them dangerous for humans (and also for dogs) when eaten in large quantities.

Is it safe to cook cherries with the pits? Ideally I’d like a reference to be sure. Is there any harmful substance? Do factories remove pits beforehand? …read more

Stock Based Pizza Dough

Does anyone know what effect, if any, substituting chicken stock for water might have on a pizza dough? I plan on mixing the dough with a stand mixer and then kneading it by hand for around 10 minutes or so. Afterwards, 3 days in the refrigerator to ferment. If it works out I am really curious to see what a fish stock would create, maybe the ultimate anchovy pizza? …read more

Dilute boiling water to make green tea [duplicate]

This question already has an answer here:

How can I easily get water to a desired temperature?

6 answers

I want to make a good green tea, but I don’t have any sort of thermometer. I only have a kettle and a bottle of water in the fridge (which is at about 5°C). So how can I mix boiling water with cold water to achieve the right temperature for green tea (about 70°C)? …read more

Stews coagulating after freezing

I often make stews with meat and veg such as beef and mushroom, cassoulet, etc. I normally eat one portion fresh and then portion and freeze the rest of my stew, to be eaten on a later date. However, often I find that when I defrost my stew portion it has coagulated – it has a jelly like consistency, even when hot. I try to solve this by adding a little water and giving it a good stir, which does give it more of a pourable consistency, but it doesn’t bring back the smooth velvety texture the stew had when fresh.

I normally just use a spoon of flour or cornflour (cornstarch) to thicken my stews, so the only ingredients are meat, veg, oil, flour, some liquid (stock, often beer or wine), and seasonings. Would a different thickener prevent my stew getting this coagulated, jelly-like texture after freezing? …read more